Industry

Italian gaming market revenue in 2014 was around €1 billion with 29m gamers, which is nearly 50% of the population, and these numbers place Italy among the largest gaming markets in Europe. Despite this scenario, game development community in Italy is not as much crowded as one could assume. In fact, and interestingly, there is still plenty of room for the community to grow in the boot-shaped peninsula.

Besides two major studios founded in the late ‘90s, the Italian game development scene has grown mainly in the last three years with the establishment of several studios around the country. Although relatively small and relatively young, the Italian game industry is moving successfully its first steps in the market and is gathering more and more attention globally. While Ubisoft Milan is the only publisher-owned development studio in the country and Milestone, with SBK and MotoGP, is by far the largest Italian company, expanded opportunities for indie game developers have contributed to put in evidence the growing pool of indigenous talents. Recently, many games created in Italy have received international recognition, from Ovosonico’s Murasaki Baby to Storm in a Teacup’s Nero, from MixedBag’s Futuridium EP Deluxe to Forge Reply’s Joe Dever’s Lone Wolf, from Bad Seed Entertainment’ Sheep Up! to Santa Ragione’s MirrorMoon EP.

Today the Italian games industry is quite various and fragmented, but looking forward, we are confident of significant growth in the next few years for Italy’s development scene thanks to major studios’ plans to expand, the rise of start-ups and new university courses. What speaks in favor of Italian developers is a fine combination of technical competence and creativity, which already defines the ‘Made in Italy’ brand in many other fields of excellence such as fashion and design. We hope we will become the next rising star in the games industry firmament.

The source of facts and figures reported in this website is the second survey on the state of game development in Italy, commissioned in 2014 by AESVI – the Italian Game Industry Association – to ASK – Centre for Research on Management and Economics of Arts and Culture Institutions. The first survey was conducted in 2011. The report has been supported also by the Italian Trade Agency. For what concerns methodology, a questionnaire has been distributed predominantly through online game developers communities and addressed to executives’ profiles. The distribution has started on July 1st 2014 and ended on July 31st 2014. A new Italian Game Developers Census will be ready by the end of 2016.